TYPES OF FLOORING


 Click the image to see some engineered hardwood options from one of our top suppliers.

Click the image to see some engineered hardwood options from one of our top suppliers.

Engineered Hardwood

Most wood flooring now is pre finished. The large majority of that is engineered as solid hardwood has become very rare. Part of the reason for this is that engineered flooring is far more stable (less expansion and contraction) and the milling is usually perfect (no warping or uneven boards). An additional benefit is that far less of the tree is used to create the top visible layer than a solid piece of hardwood. For these reasons we have decided to supply only engineered wood flooring. 

 Click the image to see some of our vinyl plank options from Fuzion.

Click the image to see some of our vinyl plank options from Fuzion.

Luxury Vinyl Plank

The market for LVP keeps growing as people become more aware of it's benefits. It has the look of real wood with no concern for water damage. This means you can run it right into kitchens and bathrooms with no worries. LVP and LVT are also very thin which means they can often be installed over other flooring without causing height problems. Another benefit of a thin floor is that it's more flexible and moulds to the contour of an imperfect subfloor more easily. 

 Click on image to see some of our best value laminate options.

Click on image to see some of our best value laminate options.

Laminate 

Laminate has come a very long way over the last decade or so. It is still one of the most affordable options for anyone who wants the look of wood without paying for wood. However, there is a lot of higher end laminate available with costs comparible to hardwood or LVP. Laminate always comes in the form of a click together floated over underlay. We have selected laminate suppliers with aggressive pricing to fit any budget. 


Types of installation


Nail Down Tongue and Groove. 

This is how hardwood flooring is usually installed on a plywood subfloor. Most wood flooring now is pre finished. The large majority of that is engineered as solid hardwood has become very rare. Part of the reason for this is that engineered flooring is far more stable (less expansion and contraction) and the milling is usually perfect (no warping or uneven boards). An additional benefit is that far less of the tree is used to create the top visible layer than a solid piece of hardwood.

Glue Down Tongue and Groove

This is how you would install an engineered wood floor on concrete if you want a solid feel since it cannot be nailed. This is a little more rare as most wood flooring is installed on plywood and therefore can be nailed or stapled down.

Floating Tongue and Groove

You would glue together at the seams (top of each groove) and float the floor over a thin underlay. The underlay evens out imperfections and gives the floor a slight cushion. It also provides a bit of a sound barrier as well as vapour barrier. This is also a common way of installing an engineered wood floor on concrete. Many stratas require this method in their buildings for better acoustics. 

Floating Click Together Floors

This includes all laminate, and most LVP (luxury vinyl plank) as well as engineered wood click together floors. Almost all click together floors are floated over underlay on both plywood and concrete subfloors. Floor levelling is very important with floating floors to prevent deflection when walking. 

LVP and LVT

Most luxury vinyl tile and luxury vinyl plank flooring clicks together. But there is a lot of LVP and LVT that gets glued down and has no click. We prefer the click together as it's easier and cleaner to install. However, the more inexpensive LVP generally is just planks that lay flush with no clicking seams and in most cases should be glued down, but there is the option to "loose lay" if desired. Some glue down LVT can even be grouted after installation to look more like real tile.